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eLearnings

Use the links below to access the HILL’s eLearnings

GOAL #1 – Leadership

Master Schedule Development

Objectives:

  • Know the purpose and benefits of a master schedule
  • Identify different approaches to solving common scheduling obstacles
  • Learn and practice methods for building a Master Schedule

Launch

Literacy Leadership Teams
Objectives:

  • To recognize the importance of a leadership team in a literacy improvement initiative
  • To identify the necessary roles of constructive literacy leadership team members
  • To examine your own characteristics and identify how you can contribute to your leadership team
  • To determine how your literacy leadership agenda fits among existing team configurations at your school

Launch

GOAL #2 – Program Implementation

The Reading Brain & Literacy Development

Objectives:

  • Review how reading development links to instruction
  • Learn new routines to target specific aspects of reading instruction with the goal of building students’ foundational skills to ultimately facilitate reading comprehension.

Launch

Small Group Skills Trace

Objectives:

  • Understand the different purposes of small group differentiated instruction and needs-based intervention/extensions.
  • Inventory programmatic components and pinpoint how they help us best situate students in small group differentiated instruction.
  • Integrate core program structure through tracing whole group Tier 1 skills to small group differentiated plans.

Launch

Alignment and Coordination of Tier 1: Whole Group and Small Group Plans (WG-SG Template Development)

Objectives:

  • Identify how the WG/SG template supports alignment and coordination across grade and school
  • Explain the purpose of a WG/SG template
  • Decide what Program components to deliver in Whole/Small group.
  • Evaluate that these choices are aligned and coordinated across classes.

Launch

Linking Instruction, Routines and Resources for Differentiated Learning (Instructional Focus to Instructional Resources)

Objectives:

  • Understand the research based “Big Ideas” for teaching reading
  • Relate “Big Ideas” to instructional focus areas
  • Match research supported instructional activities to your learners informed by data
  • Identify materials or routines from your curriculum and prior training that address research supported principles

Launch

GOAL #3 – Professional Knowledge

Small Group Management

Objectives:

  • To define small group instruction and how it provides differentiated learning
  • To explain how to optimize student groups for differentiated instruction
  • To explain how to effectively manage small group instruction through
    • Process
    • Content
    • Environment
    • Product
  • To describe ways to establish clear expectations for classroom behaviors during small group time
  • To explore ways to manage your time

Launch

Features of Effective Instruction

Objectives:

  • To explain why effective instruction is especially important for children learning to read
  • To identify the 4 main elements of effective instruction
  • To describe what teachers can do to prepare for effective reading lessons (Cognitive Preparation / Planning)
  • To describe best practices for introducing a lesson to students (“I do”)
  • To describe best practices for engaging students in practice (“We do”)
  • To describe best practices releasing students to independent practice (“You do”)
  • To  explain how to create effective routines using concise language and an appropriate teaching pace

Launch

GOAL #4 – Assessment

The Brain, Reading, and Assessments (Linking Literacy Development to Assessment)

Objectives:

  • Discuss areas of the brain involved in Reading Development
  • Link Reading Development to various Assessments

Launch

Types of Assessment

Objectives:

  • Identify the difference between an “assessment” and a “test”
  • Name the 4 general categories of assessments
  • Evaluate an assessment to understand the purpose
  • Identify when/where/how to use different assessments

Launch

Building an Assessment Framework

Objectives:

  • Describe a process to:
    • inventory existing assessments
    • identify gaps and redundancies
    • build a comprehensive framework
  • Create a Decision Tree/Assessment Flow Chart to demonstrate how to make decisions based on assessment data

Launch

Reliability and Validity in Data Collection

Objectives:

  • To distinguish between reliable and valid data

  • Recognize the importance of reliable and valid data collection practices

  • Identify three common errors preventing reliable data collection

  • Explain how schools can increase the reliability of data collection before, during and after testing

Launch

Data Meeting Process and Tools

Objectives:

  • Explain why we analyze student data
  • Explain why we analyze student data
  • Describe three elements to a Data Meeting
    • Data Sources
    • Analysis Tool(s)
    • Data Meetings
  • Identify what should happen before, during and after Data Meetings
  • Identify tools you can use to organize data and meeting outcomes

Launch

Using Data and Research to Inform Differentiated Instruction (Data to Instructional Focus)

Objectives:

  • Describe the research supported “Big Ideas” for teaching reading and how they relate to our instructional focus areas.
  • Determine how data from your school/district informs these profiles.
  • Use classroom reports to assign instructional profiles to every student.
  • Identify the implications of instructional profiles to small group differentiated instruction and intervention.

Launch

Importance of Progress Monitoring

Objectives:

  • Define Progress Monitoring
  • Describe how using aimlines for Progress Monitoring helps to guide instructional decisions
  • Explain how measuring and evaluating students at intervals can facilitate students’ reading achievement.

Launch

Aimlines to Instructional Focus

Objectives:

  • Describe how and why we use aimlines to determine instructional focus areas
  • Explain how progress monitoring aligns with the data cycle
  • Explain when and how we use the two methods of data analysis (aimline and benchmark) to make instructional decisions during data meetings
  • Analyze data to evaluate student progress and make decisions about next steps

Launch

Online Course Management

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